Peter Gaskell is undertaking this work for Historic England together with John Powell, Paul Courtney,  Jeremy Lake and Ken Smith between December 2017 and June 2018.

Currently there is limited understanding of the role of historic environmental assets in ecosystem services and natural capital approaches, and the monetary and non-monitory benefits they can provide to society. The issue is insufficiently conceptualised and there is a dearth of empirical research. The impact the project is seeking to have is to improve the incorporation of historic environment assets into ecosystem services and natural capital approaches both in terms of conceptualisation and practical implementation.

The aims of this project are to demonstrate how the monetary and non-monetary value of the historic environment can be incorporated into the four categories of ecosystem services. The project will develop a methodology that can identify the benefits and attribute values associated with the dry stone walls of the Peak District National Park, and express them in a language that is compatible with the ecosystem services approach. The project will also identify and recommend other heritage assets whose benefits can be identified and valued using the methodology.

The project team has broad expertise in historic environment research, the theory and practice of public goods, ecosystem services and natural capital approaches, the creation of research outputs and the dissemination of research findings to achieve the aims of the project.

To achieve these aims the project will:

1.   Develop the methodology:

that identifies the benefits and attributes the values associated with the dry stone walls of the PDNP in a way which is compatible with the ecosystem services approach, using clear understanding of their historic function, character and significance.

2.   Apply the methodology by:

 identifying the benefits of and gathering empirical evidence on the value of dry stone walls on the PDNP,

 and testing that the outputs (benefits and values) can be identified and communicated in a language compatible with the ecosystem services and natural capital approach.

3.   Revise the methodology

in the light of lessons learned and identify and recommend other heritage assets whose benefits can be identified and valued using the methodology.

4.   Report and disseminate the findings

by clearly communicating the results of this project to stakeholders, setting out opportunities and challenges for future application.