Evaluation-of-the-impact-ofPhD Opportunity 09/09/2015

The CCRI is currently inviting applications for a three year jointly-funded Environment Agency and University of Gloucestershire (UoG) research studentship with the title ‘Assessing the impact of farming practices on soil functions: achieving benefits for soil, water quality and flow and the farm business’.

This is a excellent opportunity for a motivated, enthusiastic and dynamic individual to join the CCRI to work on a topic of great current relevance, where there will be potential for you to develop your own interests under the guidance of experienced supervisors.

Applications are invited from graduates who have completed, or are completing, an RT (Research Training) recognised advanced (Masters) course in Environmental Studies, Geography, Environmental Planning or another relevant natural or social science discipline for what is an interdisciplinary research project. Facilities will be made available to you in one of our postgraduate research offices.

The successful applicant will be supervised by Drs Julie Ingram and Peter Gaskell of the CCRI and Dr Lucy Clarke of the UoG School of Natural and Social Sciences (NSS) . Informal enquiries can be made to Dr Julie Ingram (01242 714122 or jingram@glos.ac.uk ),

See full information, including how to apply.

Please note that the closing date for applications is 18 September.

cheese portraitBath and North East Somerset Local Food Partnership 09/09/2015

Dr Dan Keech is giving a presentation at a meeting of the Bath and North East Somerset Local Food Partnership on 10 September.

This is the multi-stakeholder network which oversees the implementation of the council’s Local Food Strategy. The strategy combines work on public health, food and agriculture sector development and the environmental footprint of the food chain. Part of its vision is to reduce diet-related ill health and inequality; reduce the local environmental impacts of food production and supply including its contribution to climate change; increase food security and support a strong and prosperous food economy.

A tale of two cities 09/09/2015

With a small grant from the Bavarian Research Alliance, Dr Keech is currently working with Otto Friedrich University (OFU) in Bamberg on a piece of comparative research examining socio-cultural and governance issues linked to food, sustainability and identity in the two cities of Bath and Bambeerg. This research has its roots in Supurbfood, a major EU project that the CCRI has been involved in which has been researching into good practice in food production and consumption in urban areas.

Marc Redepenning, Professor of Geography at OFU, recently visited the CCRI and worked with Dr Keech carrying out interviews in Bath. Dr Keech will be visiting the OFU in Bamberg next week when the partners will explore the opportunities for developing a larger project next year. A short report for the Bavarian state will be written later this year and a joint journal paper is also planned.

RSNRSN 2015 Rural Conference 07/09/2015

CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Matt Reed will be speaking at the RSN 2015 Rural Conference – ‘Aspiration to Action… The Rural Manifesto’  – which takes place on Tuesday 8th and Wednesday 9th September at the University of Gloucestershire Park Campus.

The conference will focus on key themes affecting rural councils and communities, as identified in RSN’s Rural Manifesto, including housing, health, crime, economy, finance and devolution.

For further information about the conference, including how to book, see the RSN conference webpage.

Dr Damian Maye
Dr Damian Maye

Damian Maye to give opening speech at FOODMETRES conference  03/09/2015

CCRI’s Dr Damian is a member of the Advisory Committee for the EU project FOODMETRES (‘Food Planning and Innovation for Sustainable Metropolitan Regions’), which aims to assess the environmental and socio-economic impacts of food chains with regard to the spatial, logistical and resource dimensions of growing food in metropolitan (urban) regions.

Damian has been asked by the project co-ordinators to give the opening speech at the FOODMETRES Conference on 24 September in Brussels. FOODMETRES is closely associated to food planning and governance themes which we are examining in two CCRI projects (GLAMUR and SUPURBFOOD), and Damian’s talk will draw together findings from all three projects to frame the discussion and policy questions for the day.

The conference is called ‘Towards a Territorial Approach for European Food Security’. More information about the conference.

 

gruyeres2CCRI researchers in GLAMUR workshop at EXPO – Milan  02/09/2015

Drs Damian Maye and James Kirwan are taking part in a workshop at the Milan EXPO event, “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”. This is the major annual world event on food & agriculture.

The workshop, which takes place on 13 October, will directly draw from the research experience of an EU 7th Framework Programme funded project called ‘GLAMUR’, an acronym for “Global and Local food chain Assessment: a MUltidimensional performance-based approach”. Damian and James are part of a CCRI team, one of 15 partners, who have been working on this project. The overall project objective is to integrate advancement in scientific knowledge about the impact of food chains with the application of knowledge about practice, in order to increase the sustainability of food chains through the development of both public policies and private strategies.

At EXPO, Damian and James will be chairing a discussion with stakeholders about ways to better measure food chain performance. The workshop is free to attend, but registration is essential. Download workshop programme

More information and link to Registration.

More information on GLAMUR

Damian is also involved in the Smart city food governance workshop on 28 September at EXPO. He has been invited to give a talk to promote discussion about ‘smart city food governance’. Damian’s paper will provide a critique of ‘smart food governance’ from a techno-scientific perspective and will argue for the need to also consider social practices and reflexive governance.

More information on Expo – Milan 2015

CCRI at the XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress 02/09/2015

CCRI researchers were involved at the recent XXVI European Society for Rural Sociology Congress in Aberdeen (18-21 August 2015).

Dr Damian Maye co-convened a working group (with Dr Jessica Duncan) that was concerned with examining the ‘Impacts and Implications of Alternative Food Practices in a Post-Neoliberal Transition’. Over 20 papers were presented in this working group across five sessions, including a paper presented by the CCRI’s Dr James Kirwan, which collectively provided concrete case studies and new theoretical frameworks that considered pathways and practices to shift the food systems towards more sustainable transitions.

Dr Kirwan’s paper, presented on behalf of his co-authors Dr Damian Maye and Professor Gianluca Brunori, was entitled ‘Acknowledging complexity in 21st Century food supply chains when assessing their performance and sustainability’. The paper drew on the findings of an EU-funded 7th Framework project with the acronym GLAMUR (Global and Local food chain Assessment: a MUltidimensional performance-based approach). It argues for the need to acknowledge and access the multiple, contested meanings that are attributed to both food and food supply chains. Taking its lead from post-normal science and reflexive governance, the approach posited aims to understand the significance of context and to account for multiple perspectives and realities. In so doing, it is possible to democratise and more widely legitimise knowledge claims with regard to food supply chain performance. View James Kirwan’s presentation on the CCRI Slideshare account.

Dr Maye also presented a paper (on behalf of his co-authors Dr Gareth Enticott and Dr Rhiannon Fisher) entitled: Neoliberalising nature: A longitudinal study of badger vaccination. This was part of a working group that was concerned with ‘Animalising rural societies: human-animal entanglements in a neoliberal world’. The paper, which emerged from work done as part of a 5-year Defra-funded project, examined farmers’ levels of confidence in vaccinating badgers against bovine TB. The paper argued that confidence in vaccination was linked to a range of factors, including trust in government and farmer understandings of nature and the badger population. View presentation on Slideshare.

Dr Maye was also a co-author on a paper presented by Dr Rhiannon Fisher entitled ‘The ‘good farmer’: farmer identities and the control of exotic livestock disease in England’. The paper argued that animal keeper practices are influenced by what they understand to be their individual identity as a ‘good farmer’ as well as their collective identities as perceived by those within and outside the farming sector. View presentation on the CCRI Slideshare account.

organic-cheeseOrganic food, business models and waste by Matt Reed 02/09/2015

CCRI Senior Research Fellow, Dr Matt Reed, has written a blog on organic food with relation to business models and food waste.

Matt has been researching organic food and food supply chains for nearly 20 years, so the blog makes interesting reading.

Read Matt’s blog now!

ifsa2014soilcarboningram-140409094209-phpapp01SmartSOIL: Sustainable soil management aimed at reducing threats to soils under climate change 01/09/2015

Dr Julie Ingram and Jane Mills will be attending this SmartSOIL one-day conference, which takes place on Wednesday 30 September 2015 in Brussels.

SmartSOIL is funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Community and involves twelve partner organisations from Denmark, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Belgium Hungary and the UK. The overarching aim of SmartSOIL is to contribute to reversing the current degradation trend of European agricultural soils by improving soil carbon management in soils of arable and mixed farming systems covering intensive to low-input and organic farming systems. The CCRI has been taking a key role leading one of the Work Packages.

The conference is free of charge and offers opportunities for exchange and networking for up to 100 participants from all over Europe. The event will bring together representatives of the European Commission, European Parliament, farmer unions and advisory services, NGOs, Member States and regional authorities, as well as researchers. Download programme and conference information

There are still some places available. Go to this link if you wish to register to attend the conference.

For more information, please contact  smartsoil-conference@ecologic-events.eu


wheatDr Mauro Vigani ICAE poster presentation on CCRI Slideshare 21/08/2015

The poster presentation given by CCRI’s Dr Mauro Vigani at the recent 29th International Conference of Agricultural Economists (ICAE) conference in Milan can be viewed on the CCRI Slideshare account.

The aim of the paper was to answer the following questions:
Are risk management practices (RMP) inefficient or beneficial to wheat farming productivity?
And if they are beneficial (as advocated by many authors), how much they contribute to wheat farming productivity when a natural disaster or a market risk occur?

View presentation

As well as making two presentations at this triennial conference, Dr Vigani was also on the organising committee for the conference, which is probably the most important for agricultural economists.

Dr Dan Keech
Dr Dan Keech

Dr Dan Keech recognised as Fellow of the Higher Education Academy 21/08/2015

CCRI’s Dr Dan Keech has been recognised as a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA).

The HEA is a British professional institution promoting excellence in higher education and supporting the higher education community in order to enhance the quality and impact of learning and teaching. It advocates evidence-based teaching methods and awards fellowships as a method of professional recognition for university teachers.

SUPURBFOOD – Your Input Sought 12/08/2015superbfood-logo

Matt Reed, Dan Keech, James Kirwan and Damian Maye have all been researching the future of food in cities as part of the SUPURBFOOD project. The CCRI team have been assisted by academic partners across Europe and the Southern Hemisphere and also by practitioners within the UK – namely Joy Carey from f3 and Katrin Hochberg from The Community Farm.

The SUPERBFOOD project has now reached a stage where they would like to hear from a range of people regarding their ideas. In order to achieve this, they have created an online survey where you can voice your opinions regarding urban food, which will help shape recommendations that the research team put forward to decision makers. The survey should take around 10 minutes to complete, can be completed in German, French, Italian, Latvian and Dutch and can be found here.

Matt has also penned a Blog post regarding the SUPERBFOOD project for the CCRI which can be read here.

chris-short_small
Chris Short

Paper published in Environmental Science and Policy 04/08/2015

Chris Short has had a paper published in the Journal of Environmental Science and Policy.

‘Micro-level crafting of Institutions within Integrated Catchment Management: early lessons of adaptive governance from a Catchment-Based Approach case study in England’ was published in the Environmental Science and Policy in August.  Link to paper.

The article links to existing action research in the Upper Thames catchment where Chris is involved in the formation of an innovative partnership between 2012 and 2013 that is seeking to bring environmental improvements to the rivers and other watercourses of the Upper Thames through a shared vision with a wide range of stakeholders.

For more information see the Upper Thames Pilot Catchment project page.

Links to Chris’ publications can be found in the UoG Research Repository.

RSNUpdate on RSN 2015 Rural Conference 04/08/2015

The Rural Services Network has confirmed that the keynote speaker at its 2015 Rural Conference in Cheltenham on the 9th of September will be Professor Tony Travers – the Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science.

CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Matt Reed will both be speaking at the conference, which will focus on key themes affecting rural councils and communities, as identified in RSN’s Rural Manifesto, including housing, health, crime, economy, finance and devolution.

The conference, which is entitled ‘Aspiration to Action… The Rural Manifesto’, takes place on Tuesday 8th and Wednesday 9th September at the University of Gloucestershire Park Campus.

For further information about the conference, including how to book, see the RSN conference webpage.

wheatMauro Vigani presenting at the International Conference of Agricultural Economists 03/08/2015

CCRI researcher, Dr Mauro Vigani, is on the organising committee of the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE) for the 29th International Conference of Agricultural Economists (ICAE) which is due to take place next week. He will also be presenting two papers at the conference.

The conference, probably the most important for agricultural economists, takes place every three years and this year’s event, which is taking place at the University of Milan, is called “Agriculture in an Interconnected World”. The conference aims to capture the widespread adoption of new communication technologies and embraces a wide range of interconnections that are contributing to unprecedented changes in global agriculture. (More information)

The first of Mauro’s presentations is an oral presentation of the paper “Technology adoption and the multiple dimensions of food security: the case of maize in Tanzania”, which analyses the impact of two agricultural technologies for maize production (improved seed varieties and inorganic fertilizers) on household food security in Tanzania. A set of ad-hoc indicators has been developed, disentangling the impact of the technologies on each of the four dimensions of food security: food availability, access, utilization and stability.

The second is a poster presentation of the paper “Risk management and wheat productivity in France and Hungary: A stochastic frontier approach”. The paper analyses the impact of risk management practices on the total factor productivity of wheat farms in France and Hungary. A full set of on-farm risk management practices (insurance, contract farming, varietal diversity, agricultural diversification) to cope with both production and market risks is analysed and the productivity impact of each practice is quantified.

There is also a pre-conference event, which takes place on 7-8 August 2015. The theme is ‘global food security’ and more than 30 high level speakers from academia, major international organisations and governments will be providing a closer look at the various dimensions and challenges of food security.

The main conference takes place between 9 – 14 August. (More information)

View programme.

CCRI MSc Sustainable Environments student lands job with Food Foundation 31/07/2015

The CCRI, together with the Department of Natural and Social Sciences (DNSS) at the University of Gloucestershire, offer a MSc in Sustainable Environments, which aims to produce qualified practitioners and professionals who are able to tackle the challenges that sustainability presents to businesses and institutions.

Testimony of the benefits of taking this course are demonstrated by MSc student, Alex Ward. Due to graduate shortly. Alex has landed himself a great new job with the Food Foundation, which is a new NGO that aims to present solutions to government and the private sector to address the growing challenges facing the UK’s food systems.

Congratulations to Alex!

RSNRSN 2015 Rural Conference 30/07/2015

The Rural Services Network 2015 Rural Conference, ‘Aspiration to Action… The Rural Manifesto’, takes place on Tuesday 8th and Wednesday 9th September at the University of Gloucestershire Park Campus.

CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Matt Reed will both be speaking at the conference, which will focus on key themes affecting rural councils and communities, as identified in RSN’s Rural Manifesto, including housing, health, crime, economy, finance and devolution. The conference will run over two days and delegates can opt to attend either one or both days of the conference, depending on their areas of interest and expertise.

The conference begins at 2pm on Tuesday 8th of September with two seminar sessions, the first on devolution and the second on local authority finance.

Professor Dwyer will be making a welcome speech on the morning of Wednesday 9th September, along with Cllr Cecilia Motley, Chair of the Rural Services Network and Rural Spokesperson for Shropshire Council.

The second day of the conference will continue to examine the Rural Manifesto through talks by experts in their field, round table panel discussions, and afternoon workshops. Dr Matt Reed will be presenting in the afternoon along with James Derounian, who is a principal lecturer in Community Engagement & Governance at the University of Gloucestershire. Their joint presentation is entitled ‘Rural Broadband/the Impact of Connectivity on Rural Communities and Economies’.

For further information about the conference, including how to book, see the RSN conference webpage.

WILD project. Swill Brook at Lower Mill Estate. (Copyright Cotswold Water Park Trust)

Water with Integrated Local Delivery Conference 29/07/2015

Over the past two years, the CCRI has been working with the Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group South West (FWAG SW), the Cotswold Water Park Trust (CWPT) and Gloucestershire Rural Community Council to develop the Cotswold Water Park WILD Project (Water Framework Directive (WFD) with Integrated Local Delivery).

This partnership has been working together to bring about environmental improvements to the rivers and other watercourses of the Cotswold Water Park, and has been actively supported by the Environment Agency and Natural England.

The aim of the WILD Project was to look for joined up solutions across a large part of the Upper Thames catchment. The project has successfully met the goals of the new Catchment Based Approach to water management, treating the catchment as a whole and bringing together farmers and landowners, partner organisations, communities, NGO’s and local government bodies.

In order to share learning from the project, the Upper Thames Catchment Partnership, CCRI and FWAG SW will be hosting a national conference aimed at those involved in the Catchment-Based Approach and those working throughout England in integrated catchment management.

Chris Short, who was the CCRI project leader for WILD, will be presenting an ‘Introduction to the Upper Thames and why the partnership adopted the integrated local delivery framework’. Professor Janet Dwyer is also involved and will be chairing a session on ‘Wider Connections and Funding’. Chris is also involved in field trips planned for the afternoon.

The conference will be held on the 17th September at the Royal Agricultural University. Full details are as follows:

Title of Conference: “Water with Integrated Local Delivery Conference – The Catchment Based Approach in Practice”
Date: Thursday, 17th September, 2015
Venue: The Royal Agricultural University, Stroud Rd, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 6JS
Cost: £25.00
How to book: Booking is essential. Please contact FWAG SouthWest, telephone 01823 355427, or email info@fwagsw.org.uk

More information on the WILD project.

Download WILD conference agenda and information

damian maye at 2015 Anglo-American-Canadian rural geography conference JulyDamian Maye at the Anglo-American-Canadian rural geography conference 10/07/2015

Dr Damian Maye is in Wales this week for the 5-day Anglo-American-Canadian rural geography conference, where he has presented a paper on ‘Food transitions, a multidimensional assessment of global and local food chains.

Follow Damian on Twitter.

Exmoor1New CCRI Project Summary available! 06/07/2015

In autumn 2014, CCRI was commissioned by North Devon Plus and the Exmoor Hill Farming Network to conduct a study of the state of farming in Exmoor.

The aims of the research were to describe the current state of farming on Exmoor, evaluate the changes within the last ten years and factors contributing to these changes, and outline likely future trends in the light of reforms to the CAP.

The study drew on secondary sources of data, a large telephone/on-line survey of Exmoor farmers, telephone interviews and a stakeholder workshop.

The project was completed by the end of March 2015 and the findings of the study were presented at a feedback meeting in Exford on 2 June, organised by the Exmoor Hill Farming Network. Professor Dwyer, Nick Lewis and Jonnie Felton attended the meeting on behalf of the CCRI.

The findings look at how and why Exmoor farming has changed over the past ten years, and highlight key trends and concerns for the future, with recommendations for the EHFN, the National Park and Defra. Profitability, TB impacts and environmental schemes featured high on the list of ongoing challenges, but there were also positive signs, including evidence of a younger generation keen to farm in and around Exmoor.

This research report was mentioned in the House of Commons on 1 June 2015 during a debate, brought to the House by Ian Liddell-Grainger, Conservative MP for Bridgwater and West Somerset, who raised concerns regarding the various difficulties facing hill farmers today.

A CCRI project summary of this study can now be downloaded from our website. Download

Senedd tv coverage of CCRI evidence at the National Assembly for Wales 05/07/2015

Following on from our news report of the 30 June, Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Robert Berry gave evidence on 2 July to the Environment and Sustainability Committee of the National Assembly for Wales, which is scrutinising the Environment (Wales) Bill.

Evidence Session 4, to which they contributed their evidence, can be watched via Senedd TV.  Senedd TV is the online broadcast channel for the National Assembly for Wales.

gowerCCRI providing evidence for new Environment Bill for Wales  30/06/2015

CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Rob Berry are  contributing evidence to the Environment and Sustainability Committee of the National Assembly for Wales, which is scrutinising the Environment (Wales) Bill.

The Environment Bill for Wales was introduced by Carl Sargeant AM, Minister for Natural Resources, in May this year.

Janet and Rob will be giving evidence on 2 July in Evidence Session 4, together with Professor Terry Marsden, Director of the Sustainable Places Research Institute at Cardiff University. Their evidence will relate to natural resources. The Bill includes provision for the planning and managing of Wales’ natural resources at a national and local level, and providing Natural Resources Wales with a general purpose linked to statutory ‘principles of sustainable management of natural resources’ defined within the bill. (see The Bill)

A live webcast will be available via Senedd.tv

Paper published in Journal of Rural Studies 26/06/2015

Dr Julie Ingram has had a paper published in the Journal of Rural Studies.

‘Framing niche-regime linkage as adaptation: an analysis of learning and innovation networks for sustainable agriculture across Europe’ was published in the Journal of Rural Studies 40, 59-75. There is free access to the paper until 13 August 2015.

2 reduced tilage SmartSOILSmartSOIL EU project to conclude at Brussels conference 24/06/2015

The CCRI is one of twelve European partner organisations who have been working on an EU 7th Framework Programme funded project called SmartSOIL.

To conclude this 4-year research project, a conference is to be held on 30 September 2015 in Halles des Tanneurs, Brussels, entitled “SmartSOIL: Sustainable soil management aimed at reducing threats to soils under climate change” .

Farming practices that lead to declining returns and inputs of carbon (C) to soils pose a threat to soil health and ecosystem services that soils deliver. In the SmartSOIL project, an innovative approach using the soil C flow and stocks concept has been used to assess the impact of C management on crop productivity, soil organic C stocks and other ecosystem services. The project has developed a decision support toolbox to enable farmers, advisors and policy makers to discuss and select the most appropriate and cost-effective practices for different farming systems and regions in Europe.

The final conference of the SmartSOIL project aims to present the results of the project and offer a forum to discuss the implications and opportunities for policy and practitioners. The event will bring together representatives of the European Commission, European Parliament, farmer unions and advisory services, NGOs, Member States and regional authorities, as well as researchers.

This 1-day conference is free of charge and offers opportunities for exchange and networking for up to 100 participants from all over Europe.

More information.

Dr Julie Ingram
Dr Julie Ingram

Julie Ingram attends DG AGRI workshop in Milan 24/06/2015

Julie Ingram was invited by the European Commission’s DG AGRI to participate in a workshop on Friday 19th June 2015 in the context of EXPO Milan 2015 “Feeding the planet – energy for life”.

The aim of the workshop was to launch the discussion on how we see the future of European agricultural research and innovation until 2020 and, beyond, for the following decade. The event took place

At the event DG AGRI presented the outline of the main building blocks upon which it intends to build the future European agriculture research and innovation agenda. The workshop will involve experts and participants selected to represent authorities, the agri-food sector, EU Member states, international organisations and science fields.

More information can be found on the EU website.

Postdoctoral Fellow vacancy 22/06/2015

The University of Lincoln is currently advertising a fixed-term post for a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Sport and Exercise Science to undertake research on the involvement of social factors in local food production, distribution and consumption in the city of Lincoln. Please see the University of Lincoln’s website for further information.

CCRI Seminar Series update – Today’s seminar is cancelled 18/06/2015

We regret that Will Barber’s seminar presentation, scheduled for today, has been postponed. Another date will be announced in due course. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Field trip in Helsinki formed part of the VALERIE project meeting

CCRI team attend VALERIE project meeting in Helsinki 17/06/2015

Dr Pete Gaskell, Jane Mills and Dr Julie Ingram attended a VALERIE project meeting in Helsinki on June 10-12.

The meeting was hosted by TAPIO, the forestry case study partner in the project.

Following the Executive Board meeting, the CCRI team convened a workshop for the partners that represent the ten case studies in the project. The next day there was a field trip and discussions related to the supply chain for forestry biomass energy in Finland and the options for the use of the waste wood ash (the topic of the Finnish case study). The meeting concluded with a demonstration and feedback session of the first version of ask.valerie, the smart search tool being developed in the project.

VALERIE (Valorising European Research for Innovation in Agriculture and Forestry) is concerned with boosting the outreach of research to practice in agriculture and forestry. Dr Julie Ingram is leading the CCRI project team, assisted by Jane Mills, Dr Peter Gaskell and Professor Janet Dwyer.  Go to Valerie website.

IFSA logoJulie Ingram on steering committee of the 12th European IFSA Symposium (2016) 17/06/2015

Dr Julie Ingram is on the steering committee of the 12th European IFSA* Symposium, which is taking place at Harper Adams University from Tuesday 12 – Friday 15 July 2016.

The theme of the Symposium will be ‘Social and technological transformation of farming systems: Diverging and converging pathways’.

IFSA’s 2016 symposium will focus on the social and technological transformation of farming systems and consider not only what is changing in terms of these dimensions and their contexts, but how they relate to each other and how purposeful social and technological transformation of farming systems in different parts of the world are realized and how they could be brought about in the future.

More information and booking information.

*International Farming Systems Association

Commons campaigners in the UK
Commons campaigners in the UK

Dates set for new Commons Management & Governance short courses 11/06/2015

Dates have been announced for the next two short courses in the Commons Management & Governance short course series.

‘Managing our Common Resources’, which had a successful run earlier this year, will have its second run from 28 September to 20 November 2015, this time over an eight week period. ‘Defending the Commons: Strategies for Action’ is a new short course and will take place during the same period.

The cost is £100 for each eight week course. Registration and payment can be made via the University of Gloucestershire online shop.

This is the first online programme aimed specifically at raising awareness of commons issues around the globe and has being jointly developed between the University of Gloucestershire in the UK and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) to enable the course to be delivered in Spanish as well as English. More information.

Exmoor2CCRI Exmoor report mentioned in House of Commons 03/06/2015

In March 2015, the CCRI presented the findings of a research report on the state of farming on Exmoor at a feedback meeting organised by the Exmoor Hill Farming Network, who had commissioned the work.

This report was mentioned in the House of Commons on Monday evening (01/06/2015).

The debate was brought to the house by Ian Liddell-Grainger, Conservative MP for Bridgwater and West Somerset, who raised concerns regarding the various difficulties facing hill farmers today. The vulnerability of hill farmers to economic fluctuations was raised and also complexity of the various subsidy schemes. One of the key findings of the CCRI report which was highlighted was the conclusion that subsidies had not kept pace with the growing list of environmental responsibilities. Mr Liddell-Grainger stated that we can’t expect our farmers to be ‘full-time guardians of the countryside for nothing’. He commended the CCRI report to the house and said that the Exmoor Hill Farming Network, for whom the report was produced, “is an excellent organization”.

The debate can be listened to on Parliament.tv.

presentation to Exmoor Hill Farming Group 2 June 2015 3The day after the Commons debate, on Tuesday 2 June, Professor Janet Dwyer (who led the Exmoor research), together with researchers Nick Lewis and Jonnie Felton, presented summarized results to around 50 Exmoor farmers and stakeholders, many of whom had participated in the study. A vibrant and optimistic discussion took place and the presentation from the evening can be viewed here on CCRI Slideshare.

A PDF of the full research report can be downloaded via the Exmoor Hill Farming Network website.

canada 3 compressedLatest news from the IASC annual conference in Canada 02/06/2015

Dr John Powell’s latest blog regards two interesting keynote presentations made at the IASC Commons Conference in Alberta which provide alternative views of the problems facing the Arctic in the immediate future.

Rob Huebert, a research fellow at the Canadian International Council and Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, focused on ‘Arctic Sovereignty and climate change’, while Itoah Scott-Enns, a member of the Tłįchǫ Nation (First Nation) of Canada who was born and raised in the Denendeh (land of the Dene) in the Northwest Territories, explored issues surrounding ‘Sustainability and a Future for Indigenous Youth in Northern Canada’.

Read the blog!

converted-barnDebate: Heritage & Government: towards a more coherent policy 01/06/2015

Dr Peter Gaskell has been invited to take part in a debate on Heritage and Government in London on 14th July.

Organised by the Heritage Alliance, this debate will explore the changing role the state has played and could play in protecting and promoting our heritage, an outstanding asset for the UK at home and abroad.

This event is free but registration is essential via http://www.theheritagealliance.org.uk/heritage-and-government

Last 12 Months - 1395CCRI researchers’ article published in Urban Agriculture Magazine 01/06/2015

The CCRI is one of several European partners researching into good practice in food production and consumption in urban areas as part of a major European Commission food project, Supurbfood.

This international project is looking at seven urban case-study regions across Europe and the CCRI is carrying out research in the Bristol city-region, which includes Bath and North East Somerset, Bristol City, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset (formerly the county of Avon).

Drs Matthew Reed and Daniel Keech are two of the CCRI researchers working on Supurbfood, and they have penned a 4-page article which is featured in the May edition of the Urban Agriculture Magazine, (no. 29, City Region Food Systems) produced by the global network, RUAF Foundation (Resource centres on Urban Agriculture and Food security).

This issue addresses the growing attention for policy and practice approaches that focus on food issues in urban areas from a city-regional perspective, taking into account possible contributions from urban and periurban agriculture and a strengthening of urban-rural relations. It features amongst others articles on research and policy development in partner cities involved in the Supurbfood programme.

Drs Reed and Keech’s article focuses on their research in Bristol, which was awarded the European Commission’s 2015 European Green Capital, an award conceived as an initiative to promote and reward the efforts of local authorities who are committed to improving the environment. The award is intended to spur cities to commit to further action, and to showcase and encourage exchange of best practice among European cities.

The article looks at how networks of community food activists are involved in a long and complex process of organising and lobbying for the topic of food and urban agriculture to form a part of Bristol’s Green Capital programme and legacy.

The article explores the problems perceived by the activists in relation to ‘mainstream’ agriculture and food as well as regarding the formation of their networks; it also highlights two case studies of innovative and multifunctional initiatives. In addition, the article analyses how grass-roots networks have attempted to influence food policy in the city.

In the Supurbfood project, the CCRI explored how a city region perspective aids the understanding of efforts to support sustainable environmental flows and short chain food systems in the Bristol city region.

The Magazine is be officially launched in hardcopy at the ICLEI Resilient Cities Congress on 10 June 2015 in Bonn, Germany. The online version can be viewed on the RUAF website. Drs Reed and Keech’s article is on pages 26 – 29

Julie Ingram in Brussels 29/05/2015

Julie Ingram represented the VALERIE project at the PRO AKIS final conference in Brussels on 19 – 20 May 2015.

PRO AKIS – Prospects for Farmers’ Support: Advisory Services in European AKIS – has developed a conceptual framework for assessing Agricultural Innovation and Knowledge Systems (AKIS), compiled an inventory of AKIS institutions and interactions in the EU-27 as a searchable database and detailed reports.

One of the main areas of discussion was the gap between research and practice and the role of advisory services in linking researchers and farmers, particularly with respect to advisers’ skills, knowledge and advisory organisations’ capacity in meeting new demands.

This theme is relevant to CCRI’s VALERIE project which aims to boost the outreach of research by extracting and translating “promising” research results into formats for end-users (farmers, advisers, supply chain, actors) and will develop a ‘smart’ search engine (askValerie.eu) for research outputs, for use by advisers and the farm/forestry community in general. This search tool will represent a new resource for advisers and farmers across Europe, and a new dimension to the AKIS. It will enable advisers (farmers and other interested parties) to access research outputs thereby contributing to closing the gap between research and practice.

Change of date for Robert Berry’s CCRI Seminar presentation 27/05/2015

Dr Robert Berry’s seminar presentation, ‘Mixed Methods GIS: A Research Agenda’, originally scheduled for 28 May has been re-scheduled for 25 June. More information.

CCRI seminars are free to attend, but if you intend to come along it would be useful if you could let us know by sending an email to ccri@glos.ac.uk. This will also enable us to inform you of any changes to the programme, which can happen from time to time.

Brenda Parlee speaks at IASC 2015 conference
Brenda Parlee speaks at IASC 2015 conference


Dr John Powell at the International Association for the Study of the Commons’ 15th Biennial Global Conference 27/05/2015

CCRI’s John Powell is currently in Canada attending the International Association for the Study of the Commons’ (IASC) 15th Biennial Global Conference.

This year’s conference is entitled ‘The Commons Amidst Complexity and Change’ and is taking place between 25 to 29 May in Edmonton, Alberta.

Brenda Parlee and Prateep Nayak, co-chairs of the conference hosted by the University of Alberta, opened the conference with references to the importance of the support for the conference from the Treaty 8 First Nations.

The 500 delegates attending the conference are exploring a range of local, regional and global commons issues over the next four days – including specific attention on indigenous rights of the Treaty 8 Nations and how to manage environmental impacts from energy development.

John Powell is president-elect of IASC and arrived in Edmonton a few days ahead of the conference to take part in Executive Council meetings. The council reviewed proposals for the next few regional conferences (Rome in November, followed by Berne and Alaska) and exploring options for developing the Association.

John has been writing a series of blogs at the conference.  Read them here.

A short video showing part of the opening ceremony at the conference has been published online by Edmonton Journal. The video shows First Nations dancers and drummers performing at Fort Edmonton Park during the Grand Entry at the kick off dinner on May 25. John can be seen 1.23 minutes into the video, in the background on the left behind the drummers, and gradually moving towards the middle of the screen. He is wearing a blue shirt and clutching his camera! Read John’s blog on the opening ceremony.

village-shop
RSN 2015 Rural Conference 22/05/2015

CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Dr Matt Reed have been invited to speak at the Rural Services Network 2015 Rural Conference ‘Aspiration to Action… The Rural Manifesto’, which is taking place in September at the University of Gloucestershire Park Campus.

The conference will focus on key themes affecting rural councils and communities, as identified in RSN’s Rural Manifesto, including housing, health, crime, economy, finance and devolution. The conference will run over two days and delegates can opt to attend either one or both days of the conference, depending on their areas of interest and expertise.

The conference begins at 2pm on Tuesday 8th of September with two seminar sessions, the first on devolution and the second on local authority finance.

Professor Dwyer will be making a welcome speech on the morning of Wednesday 9th September, along with Cllr Cecilia Motley, Chair of the Rural Services Network and Rural Spokesperson for Shropshire Council.

The second day of the conference will continue to examine the Rural Manifesto through talks by experts in their field, round table panel discussions, and afternoon workshops. Dr Matt Reed will be presenting in the afternoon along with James Derounian, who is a principal lecturer in Community Engagement & Governance at the University of Gloucestershire. Their joint presentation is entitled ‘Rural Broadband/the Impact of Connectivity on Rural Communities and Economies’.

For further information about the conference, please click here.

Upland grazing commons, EnglandProfessor Janet Dwyer on BBC 4 Farming Today 12/05/2015

An interview by Professor Janet Dwyer with BBC 4’s Farming Today was broadcast this morning.

With the new Uplands Alliance due to be launched tomorrow at the National Centre for the Uplands Conference at Newton Rigg College, Penrith, Janet talked about the need for better understanding between policy makers, farmers and others managing the land, and environmental and other people concerned about the future for the uplands. She said that the new Uplands Alliance aimed to start new conversations and discussions to really try to make a difference for the long-term.

You can listen to Janet’s interview on the BBC website http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05tkxq0 until 11 June.

Janet is a member of the Uplands Alliance steering group, which aims to promote better communication between practitioners, researchers and policy makers with a view to improving the sustainability of the English uplands and their management.

Members from the 14 pan-European partners met together for the first time to determine the key issues for PEGASUS

Inaugural meeting of EU Horizon 2020 project PEGASUS takes place 12/05/2015

On 29 and 30 April a CCRI research team attended the kick-off meeting of the EU Horizon 2020 funded research project, PEGASUS (Public Ecosystem Goods And Services from agriculture and forestry: Unlocking the Synergies).

Members from the 14 pan-European partners covering ten member states met together for the first time to determine the key issues for the project and set out the lines of responsibilities over the next three years. The meeting was held at St Matthews Conference Centre, Westminster, London.

The project will be investigating the benefits that agriculture and forestry provide society through the policy mechanisms of public goods and ecosystem services. The aim is to unlock the synergies between economic and environmental benefits provided by agriculture and forestry for society.

Professor Janet Dwyer, Professor Paul Courtney, Melissa Affleck and Chris Short from the CCRI team led discussions on the development on the way in which public goods and ecosystem services would be described in the project. Peter Gaskell and Katarina Kubinakova were involved in discussion on the second day concerning the case studies.

Over the next few months a website and social media will be developed and a key stakeholder meeting will be held in Dijon, France at the end of June.

The project, which started in March 2015 will run for 3 years.

See CCRI project page.

The CCRI was commissioned to undertake a study of the current state of Exmoor farming and analyse how it may change in the future Exmoor (CC BY-SA 3.0)
The CCRI was commissioned to undertake a study of the current state of Exmoor farming and analyse how it may change in the future
(CC BY-SA 3.0)

Findings on Exmoor farm study to be presented by CCRI 11/05/2015

Professor Janet Dwyer led a CCRI team to pinpoint the current state of Exmoor farming and analyse how it may change in the future.

The research was commissioned by the Exmoor Hill Farming Network, through North Devon+, with funding support from Defra and the Exmoor National Park Authority).

Janet, together with CCRI researcher Nick Lewis, will be presenting the findings of the study to farmers and other stakeholders at a feedback meeting in Exford on 2 June, which has been organised by the Exmoor Hill Farming Network.

The findings look at how and why Exmoor farming has changed over the past ten years, and highlight key trends and concerns for the future, with recommendations for the EHFN, the National Park and Defra. Profitability, TB impacts and environmental schemes feature high on the list of ongoing challenges. Findings also highlighted positive signs, including evidence of a younger generation keen to farm in and around Exmoor.

Go to project page.

Waste Food Banquet in preparation
Waste Food Banquet in preparation

Select places and food futures – Matt Reed in the thick of it! 08/05/2015

CCRI Senior Research Fellow, Dr Matt Reed, has had a busy week in which he has been an invited guest at two interesting locations.

Firstly, as a guest of the Sustainable Food Trust , Matt went on a tour of the Duchy Home Farm and Highgrove Gardens. His second visit was to a Waste Food Banquet as a guest of FareShare SouthWest, as part of the Bristol Food Connections Festival.

You can read more about Matt’s outings in his personal blog.

Upland grazing commons, EnglandCCRI helping to protect Britain’s uplands 30/04/2015

The Countryside and Community Research Institute (CCRI), at the University of Gloucestershire, has contributed to the creation of a new organisation called the Uplands Alliance, which has been formed to help protect Britain’s uplands.

The Uplands Alliance will be officially launched at the National Centre for the Uplands Conference at Newton Rigg College, Penrith, on Wednesday 13 May.

CCRI Director, Professor Janet Dwyer, is a member of the Uplands Alliance steering group, which aims to promote better communication between practitioners, researchers and policy makers with a view to improving the sustainability of the English uplands and their management.

At the launch event, Professor Dwyer will be convening a workshop to discuss ‘options for sustainable and successful farm businesses in the uplands’, with the help of colleagues from Newcastle University, Cumbria Fells and Dales, Eblex and the National Trust.

Professor Dwyer said, “The charismatic landscapes of the British uplands have long been valued by many people for multiple reasons. They provide vital ecosystem services and are an important source of drinking water, timber and food production. They provide access to the natural environment for recreation and cultural enjoyment, provide a habitat for many species of wildlife and they play a key role in climate regulation. Shaped by altitude, latitude, soils and climate, the uplands have been influenced by people over thousands of years and it is vital that they are supported by sustainable and viable land management.”

Other Steering group members include leading spokespersons from a range of NGOs and universities and colleges. The Interim Chair of the Uplands Alliance is Professor Michael Winter from Exeter and the President is Lord Inglewood. Julia Aglionby, Chairperson for the Foundation for Common Land, also played a key role in bringing the group together.

Dr Matt Reed of the CCRI provided assistance to help set up the Uplands Alliance’s new website – see https://uplandsalliance.wordpress.com/

This new initiative will provide ideas and advice to policy makers for more cost-effective upland policy support, as well as good practice lessons and inspiration for farmers and landowners

More information regarding the Uplands Conference (12-14 May 2015) can be found here http://www.newtonrigg.ac.uk/uplands/uplands-conference

Chris Short at the 'Local Spaces: Open Minds. Changing Attitudes' conference
Chris Short at the ‘Local Spaces: Open Minds. Changing Attitudes’ conference

Chris Short talks about securing a future for lowland commons 30/04/2015

Chris Short was a key speaker at ‘LOCAL SPACES : OPEN MINDS Changing attitudes’ a conference organised by the Chilterns Conservation Board/Chilterns Commons Project, which took place on 23 April.

Over 500,000 hectares of common land survive in England and Wales today. Most is on upland hills and moors, but hundreds of smaller commons are to be found across lowland England. In the past, commons were vital to the economy of local communities; today they are treasured as open spaces. In his presentation, in the context of ‘changing attitudes’, Chris explored what can be usefully done with commons no longer in agricultural management to ensure they are relevant and sustainable in the 21st century.

You can read Chris’s reflections on the conference on the CCRI blog.

His presentation can be viewed on the CCRI Slideshare account

Bread for the birds 27/04/2015

CCRI Senior Research Fellow, Dr Matt Reed, talks to University of Gloucestershire Journalism Student, Shannon O’Brien, about the dangers of feeding bread to ducks. Listen to the interview on audioBoom

University of Gloucestershire Sustainable Landscape Series 27/04/2015

The next and final lecture of the University of Gloucestershire Sustainable Landscape series for this academic year will be held on Tuesday 12th May at 6.45pm.

The lecture, entitled ‘Cities Alive– Rethinking Green Infrastructure’, will be presented by James Conway, an Associate at Arups who sponsor the series. This is also the title of a recent and substantial publication by Tom Armour, Arups global lead for Landscape Architecure.

The lecture, which is free to attend, will take place at the University of Gloucestershire’s Francis Close Hall campus in Room TC001 and starts at 6.45pm. Refreshments Will be available after the lecture in room TC002A.

More information on the Sustainable Landscape Series.

Dr Julie Ingram
Dr Julie Ingram

Julie Ingram presenting at 22nd European Seminar on Extension and Education 27/04/2015

Dr Julie Ingram is presenting this week at the 22nd European Seminar on Extension and Education (ESEE). The seminar will take place in Wageningen in The Netherlands and is hosted by the Education and Competence Studies Group (ECS) of Wageningen University.

The paper Julie is basing her presentation on is entitled ‘Co-innovation – new approaches to translating research outputs for innovation in agriculture’, which she co-wrote with Dr Peter Gaskell and P Wolf.

Although innovation is understood to encompass much more than R&D, science continues to be an essential ingredient of innovation. Many EU and nationally funded research projects in the fields of agriculture and forestry provide excellent results, but the outreach and translation of these results into field practices is limited. The challenge is to boost innovation by facilitating the uptake of this knowledge. A project that Julie and the CCRI is involved in, VALERIE, is addressing this challenge using a co-innovation approach.

The paper describes an approach to co-innovation being applied in the EU FP7 VALERIE project (VALorising European Research for Innovation in agriculturE and forestry). It sets out the project methodology, engaging stakeholders in 10 case studies across Europe, and reflects on the lessons learned in trying to ‘do’ co innovation.

More information on the conference.

More information on VALERIE

IMG_0161CCRI Seminar Presentation 23/04/2015

The next seminar in the CCRI Seminar Series will take place on Wednesday 6 May.

David Hopkins, Professor of Soil Science and Dean of Agriculture, Food & Environment at the Royal Agricultural University, will be making a presentation entitled ‘Soils and Environmental Change at the Ends of the Earth (and a few paces in between)’.

Professor Hopkins is a soil scientist and a specialist in nutrient cycling processes in soils and the dynamics of soil organic matter. He has applied this expertise in both agricultural and ecological contexts, and his work includes studies on the decomposition of residues from GM plants, the effects of soil management (particular fertilizer treatments, tillage and irrigation) on nutrient turnover, and the carbon distribution and storage in soils.

The seminar will take place at the University of Gloucestershire Oxstalls Campus in Gloucester in Room LC203B at 12.15pm. It will last around one hour and is free to attend, but if you intend to come along it would be useful if you could let us know by sending an email to cmarkey@glos.ac.uk. This will also enable us to inform you of any changes to the programme, which can happen from time to time.

butterflyHorizon 2020 Programme success for CCRI  22/04/2015

The CCRI was successful in consortia bids for two EU Horizon 2020 research projects.

Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020). It promises more breakthroughs, discoveries and world-firsts by taking great ideas from the lab to the market. It also acknowledges that research is an investment in our future and puts it at the heart of the EU’s blueprint for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth and jobs.

A large segment of the funding will be focused on some key areas of societal need or impact, such as health, climate change, the environment, energy, security. Research and innovation will be at the heart of the programme, designed to bring innovative ideas to life.

Funds are allocated through a competitive process and CCRI was part of two consortia who submitted successful bids in 2014.

The first project is called PEGAGUS, an acronym for ‘Public Ecosystem Goods And Services from land management: Unlocking the Synergies’. EU’s agricultural and forestry land provides a wide range of public goods and ecosystem services on which society depends, yet land use decisions and society often under-value these. This project will investigate the provision of public goods and ecosystem services from agriculture and forestry, aiming to unlock the synergies between economic and environmental benefits for society. The CCRI is one of 14 collaborating partners, led by the IEEP – Institute for European Environmental Policy.

The second project is called SUFISA (Sustainable finance for sustainable agriculture and fisheries) which will focus upon understanding sustainability in food chains and will identify sustainable practices and policies in the agricultural, fish and food sectors that support the sustainability of primary producers. The CCRI is one of 13 collaborating partners, led by the Catholic University Leuven, Belgium.

The CCRI intends to build on its success with the earlier EU ‘Framework Programmes’, some of which are still on-going, and the new Horizon 2020 and intends to be at the forefront of participation by submitting two further bids to the Horizon 2020 programme this summer.

2 reduced tilage SmartSOILGlobal Soil Week in Berlin 21/04/2015

Jane Mills and Julie Ingram are at the 3rd Global Soil Week 2015 in Berlin this week.

This year’s Global Soil Week aims to highlight the importance of land and soil to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in this, the UN designated International Year of Soils.

Jane and Julie are helping to run a 4 hour dialogue session entitled “Soil and land information: How to support decision-making?” They will be facilitating a participatory world café session to present and receive feedback on an ecosystems services framework for soils developed within the RECARE project. During this session a trailer for 3 films on soil threats produced by the RECARE project will be screened – link to film. See more information on this session on the Global Soil Week website.

Global Soil Week is an international gathering of people interested in sustainable soil management and responsible land governance. Policy-makers, scientists, stakeholders from civil society organizations, students, farmers, artists, as well as stakeholders from international organizations and industry from around the world come together to find strategies to ensure the sustainable management of soil and land.

nigel curry 2011
Professor Nigel Curry

Nigel Curry presenting in St Wilfrid Lecture Series 16/04/2015

CCRI’s Founding Professor, Nigel Curry, will be presenting the next lecture in the St Wilfrid lecture series.

Nigel will be looking at public policy since the Second World War, which he will argue has dismantled the social and economic fabric of the countryside.

The lecture – ‘For They Know Not What They Do: Reflections On A Lifetime Of Rural Policy’- takes place on Thursday, April 23, at 7.30pm in Ripon Cathedral.

Nigel founded the Countryside and Community Research Unit (later renamed Countryside and Community Institute) in 1986. He is also a Visiting Professor at the University of Lincoln and his public roles include Secretary of State Appointee to the Dartmoor National Park and trusteeship of a rural community council, a land trust and a community farm.

Entry to the lectures is free, tickets are available from the Cathedral Office, emailjudithbustard@riponcathedral.org.uk or phone 01765 603462. For further information please visit the Ripon Cathedral website.

Dr Julie Ingram
Dr Julie Ingram

Julie Ingram attends Agricultural Research Working Group 1/4/2015

Dr Julie Ingram attended the Standing Committee on Agricultural Research Working Group on Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation Systems – 3 (SCAR SWG AKIS-3) Foresight meeting in Antwerp on 26-27 March, 2015.

She reported on the progress of the VALERIE project which is concerned with the translation of research on agriculture and forestry into practice. For more details see www.valerie.eu and the CCRI Project Page.

Demo day for the WILD project at Swill Brook at Lower Mill Estate (© CWPT)

ACRE publishes new community guide to water environment 30/03/2015

The CCRI has contributed to a new community guide published by ACRE (Action with Communities in Rural England) entitled ‘A Community Guide to your water environment’.

The case study on page 9 of the guide refers to the WILD project, which is a partnership project in the Cotswold Water Park. The CCRI has been working together with the Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group South West (FWAG SW), the Cotswold Water Park Trust (CWPT) and Gloucestershire Rural Community Council to develop the Cotswold Water Park WILD Project (Water Framework Directive (WFD) with Integrated Local Delivery). The aim of the project has been to bring about environmental improvements to the rivers and other watercourses of the Cotswold Water Park. (Read more information about the WILD project).

CCRI Senior Research Fellow, Chris Short, who leads the CCRI input into both the WILD project and the new guide, said,

“It is really important for all members of the community to have the knowledge and information to become more involved in the management of the water environment.  This Guide outlines how that can happen and includes some good examples of partnership working, such as the WILD project, that do exactly that.”

The guide, which was produced with support from Defra and the Catchment Based Approach, can be downloaded from the ACRE website. Download guide.

Professor Janet Dwyer, Director of the CCRI
Professor Janet Dwyer, Director of the CCRI

Janet Dwyer article published in Agra Europe 30/03/2015

An article penned by CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer has been published in Agra Europe.

The full article, which considers the questions “Are member states being unadventurous in their P2 spending choices for 2015-2020?”, is available to subscribers only. Go to page.

CCRI hosts visiting students from France 30/03/2015

The CCRI is currently hosting three students from France. Mathilde Archambault and Thomas Gilbert, both from Agro-Paris Tech, are working on a project based in Exmoor under the supervision of Professor Janet Dwyer.

Magali Jonas, from AgroSup, Dijon, is working under the supervision of Dr John Powell and Dr Peter Gaskell.


P1050102Sustainable Landscape Lecture Series 27/03/2015

CCRI’s Artist in Residence, Antony Lyons, will be making a presentation as part of the Sustainable Landscape Lecture Series on Tuesday 14 April.

The lecture, which is free to attend, will take place at the University of Gloucestershire’s Francis Close Hall campus in Room TC001 and starts at 6.45pm.

The full title of the lecture is ‘Sabrina Dreaming – Hydro-geo-poetic investigations on the Severn Estuary’.

Download flyer on the Sustainable Landscape Lecture Series

minchinhamptonValues in outdoor recreation 26/03/2015

On 30th January 2015 the CCRI hosted the Outdoor Recreation Network’s (ORN) annual research seminar, which looked at the theme of values. The event was jointly led by CCRI’s Professor Janet Dwyer and Brian MacAulay of the Canal and River Trust (CRT).

The seminar was very well attended by academics, practitioners and policy makers, all of whom were attracted by the high calibre of guest speakers. These included Dr Alex Franklin and Dr Ria Dunkley from Cardiff University, Olivier Vardakoulias from NEF Consulting, Professor Alister Scott from Birmingham City University and Professor Diane Crone, University of Gloucestershire.

Some of the slides and presentations from the event can be downloaded from the ORN website.


Evaluation-of-the-impact-of‘Valerie’ brochure available to download 13/03/2015

The CCRI is one of fourteen partners from six European countries working on a four-year EU FP7 project, called ‘VALERIE’ (VALorising European Research for Innovation in agriculturE and forestry), which aims to boost the outreach of research by facilitating the integration into innovative field practices.

A new brochure is now available to download which describes the aims, objectives and methodologies of the project. The CCRI is leading the main case study work package.

Download summary of Valerie project


Last 12 Months - 1372CCRI work at the forefront in Westminster 06/03/2015

The work of the CCRI was at the forefront in Westminster Hall this week when it was highlighted during a debate over Urban Food Growing (Planning), secured by Kerry McCarthy, MP for Bristol (East) and the Shadow Minister for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

Kerry McCarthy asked the Minister why the National Planning Policy Framework does not specifically cover local food growing and called for the planning system to better protect food growing in urban areas. She referred to the urban food-growing movement which she said had taken off in recent years as people become more concerned about the provenance of their food and want to see more sustainable food and farming practices, as well as protect urban biodiversity and wildlife. She advocated that urban food growing should be part of a strategy to tackle food poverty, and the public health challenges associated with poor diets.

Bristol was one of the first cities in the UK to establish its own Food Policy Council, driving forward policies to increase the amount of land available for growing food and to safeguard the diversity of retailers. A Good Food plan for Bristol was launched, with the ambition of ensuring that everyone has access to good, affordable, healthy food. The Bristol Food Network helps to connect up all those people and businesses with a shared vision of transforming Bristol into a truly sustainable food city.

It was in connection with Bristol’s urban food growing movement that Kerry McCarthy mentioned a research study carried out by the CCRI which found that for every £1 of investment in community food projects, there was a sevenfold social return on that investment to the community. (See http://www.ccri.ac.uk/sroilocalfood/).

Indeed, until fairly recently, short food supply chains and multifunctional agriculture were considered to be part of the rural development realm. The CCRI has been one of several European partners looking at these topics from the perspective of urban rather than rural development for a major EU project called Supurbfood. Bristol city region has been the case study area that the CCRI has been looking at good practice in food production and consumption. The project began in 2012 and is due to complete in 2015. (See http://www.ccri.ac.uk/superbfood/).

Kerry McCarthy’s motivation in calling for the debate is the threat facing the award winning community food growing project in her constituency, Feed Bristol, which is the hub of Bristol’s urban food growing movement, as well as the long-established Stapleton allotments. The local council wants to put a bus route through both areas and the planning committee has given it the green light to do so.

The Bristol transport scheme received planning consent back in August 2014 and is currently with the Department for Transport for final funding approval. Kerry McCarthy confirmed that she was making an appeal to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and to the Transport Minister in a bid to stop the transport scheme going ahead.

Kerry McCarthy also argued that the Bristol case also raised concerns on a wider scale as to how allotments are sold off for development —a process that requires the consent of the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government. She claimed that out of 83 applications by English councils to sell off allotment sites for development between 2010 and 2013, only two were rejected.

Read the full debate.

MinchinhamptonChris Short key speaker at ‘LOCAL SPACES : OPEN MINDS Changing attitudes’ 03/03/2015

Chris Short is a key speaker at a forthcoming conference entitled ‘LOCAL SPACES : OPEN MINDS Changing attitudes’, organised by the Chilterns Conservation Board/Chilterns Commons Project.

Over 500,000 hectares of common land survive in England and Wales today. Most is on upland hills and moors, but hundreds of smaller commons are to be found across lowland England. In the past, commons were vital to the economy of local communities; today they are treasured as open spaces. In his presentation, in the context of ‘changing attitudes’, Chris intends to explore what can be usefully done with commons no longer in agricultural management to ensure they are relevant and sustainable in the 21st century.

Chris will also be chairing a discussion on issues and challenges relating to today’s management of lowland commons outside agricultural management. The panel will include other conference speakers as well as Nicola Hodgson, Open Spaces Society, and Kath Daly, Chilterns Conservation Board.

The conference will take place on Thursday 23rd April 2015 at Green Park, Aston Clinton. More information is available on the Chilterns AONB website.

Yumiko Yamamoto (on the right) with Kate Ashbrook of Open Spaces Society
Yumiko Yamamoto (on the right) with Kate Ashbrook of Open Spaces Society

Presentation by CCRI intern, Yumiko Yamamoto 02/03/2015

Yumiko Yamamoto, a Master’s student at the Graduate School of Agriculture at Kyoto University, Japan recently gave a presentation on the management of national trails and rights of way in England. The presentation was based on the work she conducted while she was an Intern at the CCRI in the Autumn of 2014. Yumiko’s presentation can be found on the CCRI slide share account.

Yumiko is using the work as the foundation for her Master’s dissertation comparing the development and management of national trails in England and Japan. She hopes to undertake another research visit to England later in 2015. The creation and operation of national trails is currently an area of significant interest in Japan, in order to support the development of a long-distance trail through the coastal areas affected by the tsunami of 2011.

2015-01-14 10.00.56
Severn Vale

Tour of the Severn Vale 02/03/2015

Dr Robert Berry is currently running a 5-year mapping project funded by the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE), who are providing 2k per year to fund the construction of a comprehensive geographical information system (GIS) of the Severn Vale.

As part of this project, Dr Berry recently organised a minibus tour of the Severn Vale with a group of staff and students from the CCRI and the University of Gloucestershire’s School of Geography, as well as senior representatives from CPRE Gloucestershire. The aim of the tour was to gain a deeper understanding of the physical, social and cultural geography of the Severn Vale area, to appraise current development pressures and proposals, and to stimulate discussion around project planning and future data requirements.

The Severn Vale below Gloucester is a complex area of land and water that is coming under increasing pressure from development. However, compared with the neighbouring Cotswolds and the Forest of Dean, our understanding of the lower Vale is comparatively poor. The CPRE funding is aimed to help plug this gap in understanding. Open Geospatial Lab (GOGL) internship students are helping to build the mapping database using open software and data, which it is hoped will be an important tool for helping to inform future decision-making in the area.

Read Dr Robert Berry’s blog.

Last 12 Months - 1395Gardening Cyberspace 26/02/2015

Drs Matt Reed and Dan Keech will be presenting a paper at an international conference called ‘Re-imagining Rurality’, which is to be held at the Faculty of Architecture of the University of Westminster on 27 & 28 February 2015.

The conference aims to bring together experts in spatial and urban planning, architects, and practitioners in the build environment with geographers, sociologists, artists and agricultural experts. Following recent UN findings that more people now live in cities than in rural areas, the conference will raise questions about what values and ideals are being lost and gained through rurality’s transformations; what roles designers and artists have in representing and shaping contemporary rural experiences; and what is actually meant by ‘rurality’ today.

Matt and Dan’s paper is entitled ‘Gardening cyberspace – hybrid spaces and social media in the creation of food citizenship in the Bristol city-region, UK’. The presentation will include work gleaned from extensive ‘mining’ of social media (web-pages, blogs and tweets) which link grassroots food networks in the city of Bristol. Their findings suggest that growing food is a forceful way to re-imagine rural values within the city. Following the oft-cited Spanish sociologist, Manuel Castells, they suggest that observing cyberspace reveals that food activity is both a way of performing local citizenship, and an expression of an ambition for universal social change.

More information on the conference webpage.

Dan Keech made a similar presentation in March 2014 to the University of East Anglia Environmental Science Department, as part of the Supurbfood project, which can be viewed on the CCRI Slideshare account.

University of Gloucestershire Sustainable Landscape Series 26/02/2015

The next lecture in the Sustainable Landscape Series takes place on Tuesday 10th March at 6.45pm at the University of Gloucestershire Francis Close Hall Campus in Room TC001. The seminar will be presented by James Gross.

James Gross is a graduate of the University of Gloucestershire Landscape Architecture course (DIP LA 1999) and a director at Barton Willmore in the master-planning team in the Reading office. He authored their shortlisted entry for the Wolfson Economics Prize on Garden Cities, the only landscape architect to lead a finalist submission. More information on the Sustainable Landscape Series.

Dr Dan Keech
Dr Dan Keech

Dan Keech to chair Sustainable Cities conference workshop 24/02/2015

Dr Dan Keech has been invited to chair a workshop at the forthcoming Sustainable Cities 2015 conference: “Good Food for All: from tackling immediate crises to designing long term solutions”.

Dan’s session – ‘Learning Across Borders’ – will focus on how people wishing to pursue some kind of practical interventions in favour of sustainable city food (eg. setting up social enterprises, public food procurement, food coops, developing policy interventions, engagement with planning, marketing local food, etc.) can learn from experiences from abroad.

Contributing to Dan’s workshop will be former Soil Association local food chief, Joy Carey. Joy, now a CCRI board member, has a wide and international experience of local and community food practices, including consumer buying groups, community supported agriculture and municipal food purchasing, as well as having helped to establish the Bristol Food Policy Council. Also on the workshop panel will be Dr Henk Renting of the RUAF Foundation, which supports research on urban agriculture projects in the ‘south world’, and Julian Cottee, who leads Good Food Oxford.

Joy Carey and Henk Renting are also collaborators on ‘Supurbfood’, a major European Commission research project involving several European partners researching into good practice in food production and consumption in urban areas. A CCRI research team, including Dan, is currently carrying out research in the Bristol city-region for this project.

The Sustainable Cities conference will take place on Brunel’s ss Great Britain in the Great Western Dockyard, Bristol, on Tuesday 17 March. For more information about the event, please contact: Alizée Marceau, AMarceau@soilassociation.org, Tel: 0117 314 5165.

image002How much do you know about managing commons resources? Take the Elinor Ostrom Quiz and test yourself. 19/2/2015

Elinor Ostrom won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2009 for her work on commons governance. Her work in particular explored how communities interact with ecological systems to maintain sustainable yields of resources over long time periods without leading to degradation or collapse of the ecosystem. Although her ideas are important for understanding how we might improve the institutional arrangements for sustainable management of a wide range of natural resources, and are also being applied to new forms of commons such as the internet, intellectual property rights, and biodiversity, they are not widely known.

Try taking this short quiz and see how much you know about Ostrom’s ideas and theories regarding management of socio-ecological systems.

Find out about our new online short course – Managing our Common Resources.

JAEE 2014 Award For Best ArticleFree online access to Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension best article of 2014 – penned by CCRI researchers! 11/02/2015

An article penned by CCRI researchers was chosen by the The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension (JAEE) as the best article of the year for 2014, and free access to the paper is now available online.

“Learning in the Permaculture Community of Practice in England: An Analysis of the Relationship between Core Practices and Boundary Processes” was written by Julie Ingram (lead author), together with Damian Maye, James Kirwan, Nigel Curry and Katarina Kubinakova. The Journal’s editorial committee members congratulated the authors on providing “useful insight in the way learning takes place within the community”.

Julie Ingram, the lead author said, “We are delighted to have been awarded this prize in recognition of our research. This paper looks at learning processes amongst the network of Permaculture practitioners in England. It describes this network as a Community of Practice (CoP) which means that those in the community are bound together by shared practices, values and knowledge. Whilst this community generates innovative knowledge the strong ties that bind them together can sometimes prevent this knowledge being shared with those outside the CoP. The paper looks at ways in which the exchange of knowledge can be supported, specifically at how innovations from Permaculture can be shared with those in conventional food production systems, and vice versa“.

The research was undertaken as part of the EU funded FP7 project SOLINSA (Support of Learning and Innovation Networks for Sustainable Agriculture).
The article is published in the JAEE, Volume 20, Issue 3, 2014 Special Issue: Facilitating change and innovation. Read for free online.

Managing our Common Resources – distance learning short course, starting soon! 06/02/2015

The CCRI is launching a new programme of short courses, focusing on different aspects of commons: their management, governance and sustainability, which is sponsored by the International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC).

The first course – ‘Managing our Common Resources’ – begins on 23 March 2015 and will be delivered by the University of Gloucestershire through a distance learning approach over a six-week period. Watch the trailer below….

2 reduced tilage SmartSOILDownload the SmartSOIL newsletter 04/02/2015

The CCRI is one of twelve European partner organisations working on an EU funded project called SmartSOIL, which stands for ‘Sustainable Farm Management Aimed at Reducing Threats to SOILs under climate change’.

The February 2015 SmartSOIL newsletter has just been published and is available for download.


IMG_0764CCRI seeking Research Assistant/Placement Student for 2015/16

The CCRI is seeking to appoint a Research Assistant (Student Placement) to support the research output of the Institute on a one-year placement, commencing 31 August 2015.

This is an opportunity for an undergraduate student to gain experience working in a dynamic research team, carrying out consultancy projects for a wide range of clients and making a real contribution to cutting-edge research whilst learning about rural and environmental issues and research methodologies.

Download full information


IMG_0184A goal for happiness! 03/02/2015

Professor Paul Courtney has written a feature article for the Western Daily Press regarding the potential of using tools such as Social Return on Investment, or (SROI) to design and evaluate rural policy with happiness in mind.

Many economists have been interested in ‘happiness’ for some time and feel that the current obsession with economic growth is both socially and environmentally unsustainable. They have shown that rising incomes and quality of life over the past half-century have not increased our ‘happiness’ and Professor Courtney believes that focusing policy to address loneliness, social isolation and other mental health issues would be more beneficial to rural communities.

Download the article to find out why Paul thinks we would be much better placed to make happiness the main goal of rural policy, rather than economic growth.

Invalid download ID.Vegetation management under discussion on grazing commons, Wales Vegetation management under discussion on grazing commons, Wales[/caption]


CCRI launches new series of short courses on Commons 27/01/2015

The CCRI has launched a new series of short courses, which focus on different aspects of commons: their management, governance and sustainability.

The courses will be delivered jointly by the CCRI at the University of Gloucestershire and the Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (IIS-UNAM), in both English and Spanish, under the auspices of the International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC). (View overview of courses).

Commons under discussion in Mexico
Commons under discussion in Mexico

The first course – ‘Managing our Common Resources’ – begins on 23 March 2015 and will be delivered by the University of Gloucestershire through a distance learning approach over a six-week period.

Full information regarding this short course can be found on our website. The cost is just £80.00 and you can register and pay online via the University of Gloucestershire online store.

setting up at the conferenceCCRI Policy Conference takes place in London   22/01/2015

CCRI’s 2015 Policy Conference took place at the Royal Society in London today.

It was attended by a very engaged and diverse audience, with people coming from Scotland and Ireland, as well as community groups and NGO’s across England.

The conference, entitled ‘Countryside Values for the 21st Century’, comprised of presentations based around three themes; ‘Inclusive food systems’, ‘Well-being, Happiness and Rural Policy’ and ‘Learning and Innovation for Sustainable Farm Businesses’. Delegates enjoyed a range of presentations that highlighted the link between social science theory and changes to practice on the ground.

CCRI Rural Policy Conference panelOne of the recent ‘hot topics’ has been the concept of using a happiness index to influence government policy. Not surprisingly, Paul Courtney’s presentation ‘Happiness: a goal for rural policy?’ sparked up some interesting discussion and debate. CCRI’s John Powell (Delivering well-being benefits through the RDPE ) and Margi Lennartsson from Garden Organic (Growing carrots for health and happiness) also gave presentations under the theme of ‘Well-being, Happiness and Rural Policy’

Damian Maye and James Kirwan’s presentation, ‘Re-imagining food chain performance’, highlighted the need to extend our thinking about food chains and their performance. It explored the way in which local and global food is perceived and defined in the public, market, scientific and policy spheres, by focusing on the relationships between various attributes associated with these food supply chains.

Also on the theme of inclusive food systems, principal conference organiser, Matt Reed, made a presentation entitled ‘Food in cities – the new frontier of rural policy’ which considered the role of cities in the future of agricultural food production, particularly in addressing challenges such as food security in a post-supermarket food supply chain. It also highlighted changes in the conceptualization of the rural-urban continuum.

External speakers included Tom MacMillan from the Soil Association whose presentation focused on some innovative activities they have been conducting, including the Duchy Originals Future Farming Programme, and Joy Carey from local food consultants, f3, who presented on ‘Food and Cities – Bristol’, which explored how to educate and engage people in the current food-related debates.

The external presentations demonstrated how the investments in research made by EU, DEFRA and others are feeding into agendas that are making difference to people’s lives – Urban Ag, Farmers Innovation or Happiness Well-Being agenda.

Julie Ingram, Janet Dwyer and Jane Mills made presentations under the theme of ‘Learning and Innovation for Sustainable Farm Businesses’, which were well received and triggered some interesting discussion.

A panel including Audrey Roy, from Natural England, Andy Dean from RSN and Richard Wakeford, an expert on Rural strategy and Public policy analysis and implementation, rounded the day up with discussions which highlighted the importance of working with people on the ground to realise change but that this can be informed by good social science research.

The conference was formally closed by CCRI Director, Professor Janet Dwyer. Janet commented after the conference,
“The Policy Conference has been a great success. All the presentations fostered a really interesting series of debates and I know that everyone enjoyed the networking over lunch. I hope that those people who have not been able to join us in person were able to see some of what has happened through the social media.”

Most of the conference presentations can be viewed on the CCRI Slideshare account.

WILD project featured in Cotswold Life magazine 22/01/2015

An article about a project involving the CCRI has been published in Cotswold Life magazine. The article featured the Cotswold Water Park WILD Project and appeared in Cotswold Life December 2014 edition.

CCRI’s Chris Short and Melissa Affleck are currently involved in this project, helping the delivering partners in developing and implementing the Cotswold Water Park WILD Project (Water Framework Directive (WFD) with Integrated Local Delivery). It is a partnership of primarily four organisations working together to bring about environmental improvements to the rivers and other watercourses of the Cotswold Water Park, and is actively supported by the Environment Agency and Natural England.

The partnership aims to improve the ecological status of the water bodies in the Cotswold Water Park; currently a third of all rivers in the Cotswolds Catchment are rated either as “bad” or “poor” by the Environment Agency and this project aims to change this. The defined project area centres around the Cotswold Water Park, including an initial 14 parishes and 4 towns and associated water bodies, covering approximately 25,000 hectares.

Download Cotswold Life article on the WILD project

CCRI seeking Senior Researcher 22/01/2015

The CCRI is seeking to appoint a senior researcher to develop its capacity and reputation in the area of sustainable agriculture and food and nutrition security. Please go to the job webpage for full information and application forms.

The closing date for application is 27 February.

CCRI paper shortlisted for Sociologia Ruralis ‘Best Paper 2013/2014’ award 16/01/2015

A paper authored by Professor Nigel Curry and Dr James Kirwan has been shortlisted for the Sociologia Ruralis ‘Best Paper 2013/2014’ award. The paper is entitled “The role of tacit knowledge in developing networks for sustainable agriculture

The award is new for this year’s European Society for Rural Sociology Congress and the paper is one of ten shortlisted by the Sociologia Ruralis editorial board. The winner will be decided at the ESRS Congress being held in Aberdeen, Scotland, 18-21 August 2015 (www.esrs2015.eu).

Herewith abstract of paper:brighton beach
Whilst objectivist epistemologies have been dominant in productivist agriculture, the local, cultural and environmental contexts of sustainable agriculture are more fully informed by constructivist epistemologies. Within constructivism, tacit knowledge – an intuitive knowledge that cannot be formalised – is explored empirically. Six types of tacit knowledge were identified as a result of working closely with a sustainable food network: the Brighton and Hove Food Partnership. Customs cohere around integrating food with other sustainable activity; developing a complex unregulated organisation requires savoir-faire. The unique character of Brighton has developed an operational folklore, and network identity is important, particularly in relation to conventional agriculture and to the city as a whole. A confidence in people’s roles has helped define network development and using different discourses, communicating the network in diverse contexts, is important for understanding the network. All these tacit knowledge elements have a strong influence over the network but have to be assimilated knowledge rather than learned.

Policy Conference latest

Matt Reed, Conference Organiser, gives an overview of the forthcoming CCRI Policy Conference

Julie Ingram talks about her forthcoming presentation

Professor Paul Courtney discusses his presentation, based on the theme of ‘happiness’

CCRI Policy Conference

Dr Matt Reed, Organiser of the CCRI 2015 Policy Conference
Dr Matt Reed, Organiser of the CCRI 2015 Policy Conference

For the first time in 25 years, the CCRI is holding a major event in London which will provide a platform for discussions about the future of rural areas in the UK and their ever-increasing connections to urban and peri-urban environments.

Preparations for the 2015 CCRI Policy Conference – entitled ‘Countryside Values in the 21st Century’ – are going well. Rehearsals are in full swing and bookings are coming in fast! There has also been keen interest from specialist and national media organisations.

The conference will consider how topics once confined to the countryside have become topics of wider and more pressing societal concern, such as farming and food supply, environment and climate management, and sustaining local economies and services. It will reflect on the multiple needs that 21st century society seeks to meet from the countryside, including food, energy, materials and medicines as well as recreation, leisure and residence, and to share ideas and experience about how it could and will respond.

So why not come along to hear about and discuss the latest ideas in rural policy, as well as taking the opportunity to network with policy and decision makers, stakeholders and researchers.

Book online now:  Full Rate

Please email the conference organiser, Dr Matt Reed, if you have any questions about the conference.

View the programme.

Download PDF with full conference information

chris shortDefra publish review of the Payment for Ecosystem Pilot projects 15/01/2014

Defra recently published the review of the Payment for Ecosystem Services Pilot projects, which included the Cotswold PES pilot that CCRI had been leading with a partnership including FWAG, Thames Water and a number of other organisations and farmers in the Upper Thames catchment.

The final report of the Cotswold PES pilot project is available online. The overall report is also available online. Chris Short (pictured right) was the CCRI project leader.


ImpressionSpecial SOLINSA edition of Journal published online! 09/01/2015

A special issue of the Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, Volume 21, Issue 1, February 2015, has just been published online, which synthesizes the findings of the three-year European funded project, SOLINSA.

SOLINSA involved eleven European partner organisations, including the CCRI who took a key role leading one of the Work Packages.

The overall objective of the SOLINSA project was to identify effective and efficient approaches for the support of innovation for sustainable agriculture and rural development. The special edition of Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension assembles papers that explore new ways of learning and knowledge co-production for sustainable agriculture and rural development and critically reflect the role of research and policy for supporting sustainable innovation in rural Europe.

One of the papers included in the edition was authored by the CCRI SOLINSA research team of Julie Ingram, Damian Maye, James Kirwan, Nigel Curry and Katarina Kubinakova and is entitled “Interactions between Niche and Regime: An Analysis of Learning and Innovation Networks for Sustainable Agriculture across Europe” (pp 55-71).

You can link to the online journal here, though the full articles are available to subscribers only.

For more info about SOLINSA you can download a research summary from the CCRI website – Download SOLINSA project summary.

View the project website.

Wine shop by Matt PourneyNew Project Summary available for download – Study on the Competitiveness of European Wines – UK Case Study Summary 03/01/2015

In 2014, the CCRI conducted a review of the UK wine market, as part of a wider evaluation of the EU wine sector in order to assess how to improve its current and future competitiveness.

With an analysis of UK market data, policy and literature, the review, which focused solely on still wine, also incorporated face-to-face interviews with stakeholders and gave consideration to characteristics associated with packaged (bottled) wine and wine imported in bulk for bottling in the UK.

Download project summary of UK case study

View full project report on the European Commission website.