CCRI’s Reader in Agri-environmental Behaviours, Jane Mills has successfully published another paper from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme funded research project ‘SmartSOIL’. Although the project concluded in 2015, Jane has been working on the paper entitled ‘Barriers to and opportunities for the uptake of soil carbon management practices in European sustainable agricultural production’, as she and her co-authors, which includes CCRI colleague Julie Ingram, felt that the findings warranted publication in the academic press.

Jane Mills

The paper presents findings from 50 interviews and numerous workshops that took place in five EU member states and identified a range of barriers to the uptake of specific practices to increase soil carbon that were common across all regions, although regional variations were also identified. The paper also identified opportunities to encourage the uptake of these practices. 

Jane said “I am delighted that the hard work that both I and the other authors have invested in this paper has resulted in it being published in Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. The SmartSOIL project was one of the first soil related EU projects that I was involved with, and the findings in this paper, and the project itself have been integrated into subsequent work, such as SoilCare and RECARE”.

The full reference for the paper is:

Damian Maye continues with his successful publication pedigree with two book chapters. In ‘Agri-food sustainability transitions: food geographies, governance and ethical foodscapes’, Damian develops a keynote talk that he gave last year in Innsbruck. The chapter, in the forthcoming book ‘Rural-Urban Linkages for Sustainable Development’ published by Routledge is a mostly reviewed-based piece on sustainable food transitions and the importance of ethics to inform new growth models.

Damian is also co-author in another chapter in the latest edition of the Routledge Handbook of Biosecurity and Invasive Species. Entitled ‘Contrasting national biosecurity regimes: plant and animal bio-politics in the UK and China’, the chapter examines national biosecurity regimes. It extends a paper Damian wrote in 2012 that compared biosecurity regimes in the UK and Australia. They examine China in the chapter and show the difference ways animals and plants are governed in both cases, plus relations between international regimes and local practices.

Full references for the two books are:

  • Maye, D. (2019/2020 – forthcoming) Agri-food sustainability transitions: food geographies, governance and ethical foodscapes. In Krazer, A., Kister, J. and Zirkl, F. (eds.) Rural-Urban Linkages for Sustainable Development. Routledge, Abingdon, forthcoming.
  • Maye, D. and Chan, R. (2019/2020 – forthcoming) Contrasting national biosecurity regimes: plant and animal bio-politics in the UK and China. In Fall, J., Francis, R., Schlaepfer, M. A. and Barker, K. (eds.) The Routledge Handbook of Biosecurity and Invasive Species. Routledge, Abingdon, forthcoming
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